Friday, October 3, 2008

That wetland may be worthless, but that won't stop the forest animals from pleading for their land Mark Trail from punching your lights out before Sneaky steals your purse.

3 comments:

Everett Volk said...

Next up, three days of collaboration between Jack Elrod and Mark Tatulli of Lio. The confluence of Elrod's realist approach to cartooning and Tatulli's fantastical approach should be interesting. What do we see after the "What?" Hopefully, one of Tatulli's monsters is about to get all monster-y on the blond lass, rending her limb from limb and sowing the drying wetland with her precious (and wet!) bodily fluids, thus restoring it (the wetland!) to life.

Or, more likely, Mark Trail's right fist o' coiffure, daintily re-arranging her precious blond curls...

Paul Arrand Rodgers said...

Well, what we got is decidedly somewhere in-between those two. ALLIGATORS DEVOURING BLOND WOMEN!

tung said...

n 1894, Roosevelt met Jacob Riis, the muckraking Evening Sun newspaper journalist who was opening the eyes of New York's rich to the terrible conditions of the city's millions of poor immigrants with such books as, How the Other Half Lives. In Riis' autobiography, he described the effect of his book on the new police commissioner:
When Roosevelt read [my] book, he came....No one ever helped as he did. For two years we were brothers in (New York City's crime-ridden) Mulberry Street. When he left I had seen its golden age.... There is very little ease where Theodore Roosevelt leads, as we all of us found out. The lawbreaker found it out who predicted scornfully that he would “knuckle down to politics the way they all did,” and lived to respect him, though he swore at him, as the one of them all who was stronger than pull....that was what made the age golden, that for the first time a moral purpose came into the street. In the light of it everything was transformed.
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